Professional percussionists may be prone to occupational injury

Washington, Aug 19 (ANI): Scientists have reported that professional percussionists may be at a risk for an unusual injury of wrists.

Drs. Naoto Yokogawa and H. Ralph Schumacher, Jr., rheumatologists at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, describe and illustrate this unusual occupational injury.

One patient reported a growing but painless mass on his left wrist. He had previously had a similar growth on the right wrist, which cleared up without treatment. Although he had not had any previous injuries, he had been playing the percussion for 30 years.

X-rays revealed a specific type of wrist deformity called scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), in which there is “collapse” of certain bones of the wrist joint.

An MRI scan showed that the mass on the patient”s hand was caused by tenosynovitis—inflammation of the tissues surrounding the wrist tendons.

The SLAC wrist is caused by trauma, manual labour, or other causes and if painful, surgery may be needed to correct the wrist deformity.

The team thinks that repeated “microtrauma,” caused damage to the wrist ligaments over time, eventually leading to the SLAC wrist deformity.

The find is presented in a report in the August issue of JCR: Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. (ANI)

Realistic portraits of celebs created using £5 iPad app

London, Aug 19 (ANI): An illustration and animation graduate has created a number of realistic portraits of celebrities by using the simple iPad app Brushes, which costs just 4.99 pounds.

Kyle Lambert, 23, created portraits of celebs like Amy Winehouse, Rihanna, Jennifer Aniston, Russell Brand, Madonna, and Jude Law.

“There’s a lot of parallels to draw from painting in real life. The only difference is you’re using your finger,” the Daily Mail quoted him as saying.

“It’s very direct and it can be quicker, and I love the portability element,” he stated.

Lambert, from Altringham in Cheshire, says the pictures can take up to eight hours to complete, and that with a bit of practice, anyone with an iPad could create the same level of artwork.

He has posted videos of him completing his work on YouTube where he his speeded up animations have received more than 300,000 hits.

“It’s a great form of art because after you’ve finished you can watch back the process. It’s almost like a performance art,” he added. (ANI)

Scientists discover ancient galaxies that are still forming stars

Washington, Aug 19 (ANI): Astronomers from Texas A&M have discovered a significant fraction of ancient galaxies that are still actively forming stars.

Dr. Kim-Vy Tran and her team used NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope to discover that a high-redshift cluster known as CLG J02182-05102, shockingly “modern” in its appearance and size despite being observed just 4 billion years after the Big Bang, still produces hundreds to thousands of new stars every year.

The stellar birthrate is higher in the cluster’s center than at the cluster’s edges — the exact opposite of what happens in our local portion of the Universe, where the cores of galaxy clusters are known to be galactic graveyards full of massive elliptical galaxies composed of old stars.

“There are more star-forming galaxies in the field than in the crowded cores of galaxy clusters. However, in our cluster, we find many galaxies with star-formation rates comparable to their cousins in the lower-density field environment,” said Tran.

Exactly why this star power increases as galaxies become more crowded remains a mystery.

Tran thinks the densely populated surroundings could lead to galaxies triggering activity in one another, or that all galaxies were extremely active when the Universe was young.

Astronomers can now focus on understanding why massive assemblies of galaxies transition from very active to passive.

“Our study shows that by looking farther into the distant Universe, we have revealed the missing link between the active galaxies and the quiescent behemoths that live in the local Universe,” Tran added.

Tran will continue to examine these clusters more thoroughly and hopefully to understand why they are still so energetic.

“We will also start looking at several more distant galaxy clusters to see if we find similar behaviour,” she said.

The team’s findings are detailed in their paper, “Reversal of Fortune:

Confirmation of an Increasing Star Formation-Density Relation in a

Cluster at z=1.62.” (ANI)

5000 stone statues older than Terracotta warriors discovered in Hunan

New Delhi, Aug 19 (ANI): Archaeologists have discovered a large group of ancient stone statues at the worship site of Guizai Mountain near Hunan province.

According to People’s Daily Online, these statues are a lot more in number and a lot older than the Qin Terracotta Warriors found in the depths of the Nanling Mountains located in Dao County of Yongzhou City.

Tang Zhongyong, director of the Dao County Administrative Office, said that the Guizai Mountain site is a large ancient worship site. There are over 5,000 vivid stone statues at the site, covering an area of 15,000 square meters. They are statues of civil officials, military officers, pregnant women and all kinds of common soldiers and their height varies from 30 to 100 centimeters.

Archaeology experts in Hunan said that there are over 5,000 stone statues on the ground and a large number of stone statues buried about two meters below the ground.

The Hunan Cultural Relics Department also found that the statues are the group of stone portraits with the longest history found in China by far.

Some were carved in prehistoric times about 5,000 years ago, and some were carved during the Qin, Han, Wei and Jin dynasties about 2,000 to 5,000 years ago.

Based on the existing information and field investigations, archaeologists deduced that Guizai Mountain was simply a large altar and that prehistoric people placed stone statues on it. (ANI)

Maternal stress linked to psychiatric disorders in offspring: Study

Washington, Aug 19 (ANI): A new study has reported that neuro-developmental disorders, which include mood disorders, schizophrenia, autism and eating disorders, are associated with foetal exposure to maternal stress or infection and malnutrition, according to a new study.

Sex is another factor that influences the risk for psychiatric disorders.

In the new study, authors discuss findings where maternal stress has been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in male offspring and may alter foetal brain growth.

Maternal stress, infection, and/or exposure to famine may also contribute to an elevated risk for depression in offspring.

So later influences, such as exposure to child abuse and/or neglect, must also be taken into account.

By applying the principals of personalized medication, one can view this science as “personalized prevention,” as it aims to apply these principals earlier in the pathological process.

Understanding and defining these disease mechanisms at the very earliest points in life could help identify novel targets in therapy and prevention.

The review has been published in Biological Psychiatry. (ANI)

Home

Scientists discover ancient galaxies that are still forming stars

Washington, Aug 19 (ANI): Astronomers from Texas A&M have discovered a significant fraction of ancient galaxies that are still actively forming stars.

Dr. Kim-Vy Tran and her team used NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope to discover that a high-redshift cluster known as CLG J02182-05102, shockingly “modern” in its appearance and size despite being observed just 4 billion years after the Big Bang, still produces hundreds to thousands of new stars every year.

The stellar birthrate is higher in the cluster’s center than at the cluster’s edges — the exact opposite of what happens in our local portion of the Universe, where the cores of galaxy clusters are known to be galactic graveyards full of massive elliptical galaxies composed of old stars.

“There are more star-forming galaxies in the field than in the crowded cores of galaxy clusters. However, in our cluster, we find many galaxies with star-formation rates comparable to their cousins in the lower-density field environment,” said Tran.

Exactly why this star power increases as galaxies become more crowded remains a mystery.

Tran thinks the densely populated surroundings could lead to galaxies triggering activity in one another, or that all galaxies were extremely active when the Universe was young.

Astronomers can now focus on understanding why massive assemblies of galaxies transition from very active to passive.

“Our study shows that by looking farther into the distant Universe, we have revealed the missing link between the active galaxies and the quiescent behemoths that live in the local Universe,” Tran added.

Tran will continue to examine these clusters more thoroughly and hopefully to understand why they are still so energetic.

“We will also start looking at several more distant galaxy clusters to see if we find similar behaviour,” she said.

The team’s findings are detailed in their paper, “Reversal of Fortune:

Confirmation of an Increasing Star Formation-Density Relation in a

Cluster at z=1.62.” (ANI)

NASA, Mary J. Blige team up to encourage science careers for women

Washington, Aug 19 (ANI): NASA and award-winning recording artist Mary J. Blige are teaming-up to encourage young women to pursue exciting experiences and career choices by studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

A public service announcement featuring veteran NASA space shuttle astronaut Leland Melvin and Blige debuts this week on NASA TV and the agency”s website at: http://www.nasa.gov.

NASA”s Summer of Innovation (SoI) project and Blige”s Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now (FFAWN) have much in common. Both show students the many possibilities available if they follow their dreams and reach for the stars.

The SoI project is part of the President”s Educate to Innovate Campaign. It started earlier this summer to help keep middle school students engaged in fun and stimulating STEM-related activities during the school break.

“Working with FFAWN is a rare opportunity to help spread the STEM message into communities not always readily accessible to us,” Melvin

said.

“Mary”s presence can help NASA make the STEM message more appealing to these communities and increase the pipeline of underrepresented students going into these disciplines,” Melvin added.

Working with the NASA Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Aerospace

Academy project at York College of the City University of New York (CUNY), the joint effort is providing on-the-job training for FFAWN high school participants. High school girls in the program will be prepared to deliver NASA SoI content to middle school students this summer at the New York City Housing Authority Van Dyke Community Center and the Harlem Children”s Zone Promise Academy.

The FFAWN participants also will have the opportunity to support the NASA Academy fall academic session at CUNY as student aides for grades one through nine later this year. (ANI)

Swine flu vaccine launched :Swine flu H1N1 vaccine Indias first Nasal Spray Vaccine

To face worldwide threat from the slaughterer disease H1NI, the country is gearing up to instigate a cheaper and painless way out against the virus called a ready to sniff swine flu vaccine. The vaccine Nasovac is going to be launched and is predictable to be available for commercial use in coming ten days.

The Drug Controller General of India (DCGI0 has given green signal to Serum Institute of India (SII) to bazaar the  India’s first intra nasal indigenous H1N1 flu vaccine. The new vaccine has been tested to be safe for children and people of any age and can be governed without any unfavorable effects.

This is the user friendly vaccine and they are in the course of completing the official procedure. They want to make sure sufficient stock of doses of the vaccine, explained Cyrus Poonawalla, chief managing director of the SII. They will manufacture half-a-million doses in July and another one million in August. They will test market conditions before manufacturing on a large scale.

“We now have capabilities, in collaboration with global healthcare agencies, to respond with affordable preventive vaccines for pandemic healthcare emergencies anywhere around the world.”

A little about Nasovac
Nasovac, meant for the H1N1 pandemic strain, is a nasal spray in powder form, which has to be reconstituted by adding water.

A single dose of 0.5ml of the vaccine is delivered directly to the nasal cavity through a device fitted at the top of the syringe.

A quick spray in each nostril and the body develops antibodies to protect against the deadly virus for a period of over a year or even more.

According to experts, the nasal spray may prove to be effective as it takes the same respiratory route as the H1N1 virus. It has the efficiency to fight H1N1 infection even if small changes occur in the virus.

After vaccination, some negligible or very mild reactions may be experienced for two to three days.

Safety and efficacy assessed
The safety and efficacy of the vaccine was assessed through clinical trials

on more than 300 human subjects in the country.

The vaccine has been approved by the Drug Controller of India (DCGI) and can be safely administered to any individual above three years.

However, SII is not recommending the vaccine for pregnant women and lactating mothers.

Dr Cyrus Poonawalla, chairman, SII stated, “Our recommendation is that it (Nasovac) should not be administered to pregnant and lactating women, besides children below three years.

“But the medical fraternity says this decision should be left to them. They think that if the women are in a high-risk area, they should be vaccinated. So we have no objection, but it is better that if these vaccines are not given to them.”

Economically priced
In order to increase its commercial use among the masses, Nasovac is economically priced.

SII has set a sale target of 20-25 million doses in first year.

In addition, SII donated vaccines worth Rs 10 crore to various hospitals, NGOs, and the underprivileged.

Mansoor Ahmed, marketing director, SII, said, “The product will be available across the country in the next few days. It is priced at Rs. 158 per dose and available in the 5-vial pack for Rs. 790.

“As of now, we have the capacity to make 50 million doses. But this can be scaled up in the coming months to 150 million or even 200 million doses if needed. As of now, we are only concentrating on the Indian market and will address the export market later.”

Solar Tsunami on Earth Photos Solar Tsunami on Earth News Videos Photos

Some people have been urging fellow-earthlings to look toward the north for rippling curtains of red and green light.

Others have been worried about an electronic Armageddon.

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which captures high-definition views of the sun at a variety of wavelengths, snapped an X-ray photo of the Sun early in the morning of Sunday, August 1st.

The satellites recorded a dark arc, identified as a large filament of cool gas stretching across the Sun’s northern hemisphere also exploded into space.

The explosion, called a coronal mass ejection, was aimed directly towards Earth, which then sent a “solar tsunami” racing 93 million miles across space.

When a coronal mass ejection (touted as a ‘solar tsunami’) reaches Earth, expected to happen on August 4, solar particles stream down the planet’s magnetic field lines toward the poles.

In the process, the particles collide with atoms of nitrogen and oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere, which then glow, creating an effect similar to miniature neon signs.

The interaction between solar particles and the magnetic field has the potential to create geomagnetic storms in Earth’s magnetosphere.

And while aurorae are normally visible only at high latitudes, they can light up the sky even at lower latitudes during a geomagnetic storm.

However, the atmosphere filters out nearly all of the radiation from the solar blast, while the magnetic field deflects any magnetic particles produced.”

Experts said the radiation “almost never” makes it to ground, though pilots and passengers in airplanes may experience increased radiation levels akin to getting an X-ray.

The solar particles also could affect satellites, though scientists think that possibility is remote.

But it can have serious consequences too.

Orbital Sciences Corp. believe a similar blast may have knocked its Galaxy 15 satellite permanently out of action this year.

NASA scientists warned recently that high-energy electric pulses from the sun could cripple our electrical grid for years, causing billions in damages.

The sun’s activity usually ebbs and flows on a fairly predictable cycle. Typically, a cycle lasts about 11 years, taking roughly 5.5 years to move from a solar minimum, a period of time when there are few sunspots, to peak at the solar maximum, during which sunspot activity is amplified.

The last solar maximum occurred in 2001, but was particularly weak and long lasting.

The most recent solar eruption is one of the first signs that the sun is waking up – and heading toward another maximum.

But other media reports said this solar storm is likely to fizzle out, and that a much more intense solar storm, in fact, happened in April.

Experts said the wave of supercharged gas will likely reach the Earth on Tuesday, when it will buffet the natural magnetic shield protecting Earth. It is likely to spark spectacular displays of the aurora or northern and southern lights.

1 121 122 123